i'm pretty wired.

my name is megan. art stuff, writing stuff, and not enough warren zevon.
very bad tweets @Muschifurz

againstmyweaponry:

janesfoster:

Bring it d o w n

things got dark for liara in mass effect 4

"shepard.  shepard.  ş̠̦̗̪̠̎͢͜h̰̞͔̟̭̞͉͒ͨe̴͔͓ͮ́ͤ́͡ṕ̰̖̺ͭͣ͟a̢̨͍̰̳̺̫̩̬ͩ̐̑̊̅r͍̘̱͋̌̄̍́̋́ͅḑ͕̰̲̻̳̏́ͅ.̴͙̻ͥ̽ͭͯ̽̀”

supersonicart:

Hikari Shimoda’s “Fantastic Planet, Goodbye Man" Preview and Interview.

This Saturday, July 19th Corey Helford Gallery Circa in Culver City, California will be presenting Hikari Shimoda’sFantastic Planet, Goodbye Man.

Hikari’s pastel colored work features horned children with stars in their eyes and scars on their necks, that are painted in a style reminiscent of Manga and Anime, as metaphorical essays on the fragile mortality of human life. These ideas have been influenced by such occurrences as the Fukushima Reactor and Chernobyl disasters.

I had the chance to ask the very gifted and outstanding artist a few questions about her work, thoughts on eyes, and beliefs behind “Fantastic Planet, Goodbye Man" which you can read below (And also see more paintings and studio shots!):

Read More

sosuperawesome:

Mini paintings on cedar by Cathy McMurray on Etsy

Updated Science: The Science of Body Language

fakescience:

The Science of Body Language

  • Since we first published this science, nothing about Sally has changed. Nothing. Sometimes, you talk to her and you’re about to say, “Sally, don’t you realize your body language indicates deep-seeded issues with commitment? Issues that spring from your own narcissistic fear of aging?” But then you just cross your arms (classic body language) and listen to her complain about how it’s too difficult to return a used dress to the department store.

chechula:

Saruman of Many Colours :3 ….i think he should looks like oil stamp….at least i like drawing him like this….

i need draw some proper picture with him…:3

(via sosuperawesome)

iguanamouth:

he who fights with monsters should look to it that he himself does not start playing dnd as one - friedrice nicesheep

(via conquerorwurm)

explore-blog:

Ray Bradbury on failure, why we hate work, and the importance of love in creative endeavors – a wonderful addition to our ongoing archive of sage advice on writing and life.

explore-blog:

Ray Bradbury on failure, why we hate work, and the importance of love in creative endeavors – a wonderful addition to our ongoing archive of sage advice on writing and life.

zohbugg:

wyeasttokaala:

I already liked Old Economy Steve. So, it was only natural I’d like the Scumbag Baby Boomer meme as well.

I don’t know whether I should laugh or cry.

the truth, it burns

(via fuckyeahwomenprotesting)

reverseracism:

cyberrghetto:

omg

Dear White People Official Trailer 1 (2014) - Comedy HD

(via cynickels)

“For centuries, the myth of the lone genius has towered over us, its shadow obscuring the way creative work really gets done. The attempts to pick apart the Lennon-McCartney partnership reveal just how misleading that myth can be, because John and Paul were so obviously more creative as a pair than as individuals, even if at times they appeared to work in opposition to each other. The lone-genius myth prevents us from grappling with a series of paradoxes about creative pairs: that distance doesn’t impede intimacy, and is often a crucial ingredient of it; that competition and collaboration are often entwined. Only when we explore this terrain can we grasp how such pairs as Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak, William and Dorothy Wordsworth, and Martin Luther King Jr. and Ralph Abernathy all managed to do such creative work. The essence of their achievements, it turns out, was relational. If that seems far-fetched, it’s because our cultural obsession with the individual has obscured the power of the creative pair.”

—   

Joshua Wolf Shenk, author of The Power of Two: Finding the Essence of Innovation in Creative Pairs, explores the power of creative duos in an essay for The Atlantic. 

Complement with a brief history of the genius myth.

(via explore-blog)

(via amandapalmer)

cross-connect:

The Vibrant and Passionate Painting of Duarte Vitoria

To his painting, Duarte Vitoria, has known how to interpret the crisis, a constant tension which, even if it bothers the spectator’s eye, searches to represent that state of unfinished and not possible to overcome anguish of human condition. All his work has perfect conscience that is in this state of unfinished in which lays the path of art, a way without end and that tends to satisfaction without being possible to reach it. In the contingency of the suffering of the path – not the suffering during the path, but the notion of suffering the path – what the painter shows us has always to do with the incapability of plentifulness.

THE OBEDIENCE TO CRISIS, PAINTING OF DUARTE VITORIA
VALTER HUGO MÃE, 2006

Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew

“…go out upon that, build yourself a hut, and there begin the grand process of devouring yourself alive.”

steffenroymitchell:

inkskinned:

centerofyourlife:

inkskinned:

i take steps to avoid elevators

I first glanced at this post then scrolled past it thinking “Why would you avoid elevators?” Then I realized exactly /why/ any targeted person would do that. When I thought this I became insanely afraid for myself just at the thought of using elevators. It is a sad time.

it is a very sad time and i actually hate elevators but this was a pun my love read it again

God damn it.

apollojustlce:

hanging out with your best friend more like

image

(via mlroberts)